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Letter: A nation at a crossroad

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For almost 200 years the Supreme Court of the United States affirmed that this is a Christian nation. But in 1962 things changed. America began to turn its back on God. The Supreme Court, without any precedent, banned this prayer from the New York school system: "Almighty God, we acknowledge our dependence upon Thee, and we beg Thy blessings upon us, our parents, our teachers and our country. Amen."

Ten years later the court again without precedent legalized abortion on demand in the United States. Are we better off as a nation as a result of these rulings? These decisions and laws were perpetrated by justices legislating from the bench. These were not decisions made by elected officials, but by judges appointed to the bench.

Ask yourself: Are schools, families, homes and this nation better because of these decisions? Are we a better nation because we have allowed 50 million babies to be aborted? The abortionists of America make the Holocaust look like the work of amateurs.

Many of our Founding Fathers were concerned about national sins. George Mason, the father of the Bill of Rights, reminded the delegates at the Constitutional Convention: "As nations cannot be rewarded or punished in the next world, so they must be in this." By an inevitable chain of causes and effects, providence punishes national sins by national calamities. Are we experiencing national calamities because we have become a post-Christian nation?

Next week we will choose a new president. The most important thing that the president will do is to appoint two or more justices to the Supreme Court.

Barack Obama will appoint justices favorable to abortion, gay marriage and other liberal agenda items. John McCain will appoint more conservative judges who will return the bench to its proper role of upholding the Constitution instead of fabricating new laws.

We are at a very critical crossroad. Will you vote to uphold the principles upon which our country was founded? Thomas Jefferson may have said it best, "I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just: that His justice cannot sleep forever."

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