Weather Forecast

Close
Advertisement

Letter: A nation founded on faith

Email

Over the years there have been several attempts to remove any semblance of God from our everyday lives.

However, our government is full of indisputable evidence that God was an integral part of our country's founding, as evidenced by James Madison, America's fourth president. He is credited with making a statement that went something like this: We have staked the future upon the capacity of mankind to be able to govern ourselves, to control ourselves, to sustain ourselves according to the Ten Commandments of God.

The preceding statement should speak for itself. No one should have to hire an attorney to decipher what it means. There are many other examples of God's involvement in our country's founding, such as the words of Patrick Henry, patriot, and one of our Founding Fathers, and I quote: "It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this great nation was founded not by religionists but by Christians, not on religions but on the Gospel of Jesus Christ."

How many people are aware that every session of Congress begins with a prayer by a preacher whose salary has been paid by the taxpayers since 1777, and that 52 of the 55 original founders were members of the established churches in the original 13 colonies? Thomas Jefferson was also worried that the courts would eventually overstep their legal authority, and instead of interpreting the law, they would begin making law an oligarchy, the rule of a few over many. The first Supreme Court Justice, John Jay, said this: "Americans should select and prefer Christians as their rulers."

How have we gotten to the point where everything we've done in this country for 220 years is now suddenly wrong, or unconstitutional? In my opinion, we should let the rest of the world judge how America was founded.

Since 86 percent of Americans are thought to believe in God, why is such a mess made out of displaying the Ten Commandments in public, or of having the words "In God We Trust" printed on our money, or leaving the word "God" in the Pledge of Allegiance?

Norm Baker

Willmar

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
randomness