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Letter: Real reasons for climate change

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You've probably noticed the new green and black receptacles shaped like a bottle, posted near gas stations and other retail stores. Seems like a good idea for collecting recyclables.

However, I must disagree with the propaganda written on them: "Recycling reduces pollution that leads to climate change." Also, a picture of a box filled with recyclables next to planet Earth with caption above each: "Use it or Lose it." There is also a Web site, Recylemoreminnesota.org, listed which I checked into for back-up data justifying their claim, I found no back-up data; if I missed something, let me know.

I believe that "man-generated" (anthropogenic) greenhouse gases currently in our atmosphere cannot possibly effect climate change for the following reasons:

Water vapor, which makes up about 95 percent of all greenhouse gases, has twice the heat capacity of carbon dioxide. The Recyclemore Web site doesn't show water vapor on their bar graph.

Carbon dioxide, (natural plus anthropogenic) makes up only about 3.6 percent of all greenhouse gases. Other miscellaneous gases make up the remaining 1.4 percent.

The anthropogenic portion of atmospheric carbon dioxide is about 3 percent. Mother Nature recycles about 33 times that amount through photosynthesis.

The oceans hold 60 times more carbon dioxide than the atmosphere, and act as a giant heat-sink storage reservoir, releasing and absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere depending on temperature differentials at the air-sea interface. As sea temperatures go up, more carbon dioxide is released.

The biggest factor in forcing temperature is the sun's surface activity. Historically the mini-Ice Age from 1640 to 1720 was a result of low sunspot activity. The medieval warm period from 900 to 1200 A.D. was probably a result of high solar activity.

The heat per square meter forced on our planet by the sun is about 20 times greater than atmospheric carbon dioxide per square meter near the earth's surface; and remember, only 3 percent of that carbon dioxide is manmade.

In summary: It's the sun and ocean, not man's puny efforts, that change climate.

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