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Man held on $200K bond, faces drug charges for meth, drug items

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WILLMAR — Steven Allen Strand Jr., 28, of Willmar, made his first court appearance Friday on felony second- and fourth-degree drug sale charges for methamphetamine found in his possession when the vehicle he was riding in was stopped Wednesday by Willmar Police officers.

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Unconditional bail was set at $200,000. His next appearance is March 4 in Kandiyohi County District Court.

Strand also faces petty misdemeanor charges for possession of a small amount of marijuana and drug paraphernalia.

According to the complaint, Willmar Police officers in an unmarked squad stopped behind a pickup on First Street Wednesday evening and noticed that the driver turned his head quickly, saw that the vehicle behind him was a squad car and then turned his head quickly. The passenger also took quick glances back at the squad car.

The officers followed the pickup onto Trott Avenue, noticed that the rear license plate was obscured by snow and that the vehicle had a very loud exhaust. They initiated a traffic stop and noticed the passenger, Strand, was going through his pockets and attempting to tuck something in the seat of the pickup.

The officers determined that Strand was wanted on an arrest warrant from Stearns County on a terroristic threats charge. A search of his person revealed a total of 7 grams of meth, in multiple packages, two cell phones, a stun gun and a large folding knife.

Officers also searched the vehicle and located a bag stashed in the passenger’s side of pickup. The bag contained multiple items of drug paraphernalia, scales, cell phones, spoons, mirrors, drug cutting material, knives and a meth pipe containing white residue.

The man driving the pickup told officers he’d given Strand a ride and that Strand had the bag with him when the man picked him up at a First Street business.

Strand was interviewed and claimed all of the items were his possessions and didn’t belong to the driver, but that the stuff actually belonged to someone else, whom he would not name for the officers.

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Gretchen Schlosser

Gretchen Schlosser is the public safety reporter, and writes about agriculture occasionally, for the West Central Tribune. She's been with the Tribune since 2006 and has 17 years of experience working in news, media and communications. 

(320) 214-4373
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