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Slow down and move over

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Carolyn Lange / Tribune Faith Wilson, owner of Ed's Service Center, from left, Jason Butler, owner of City Line Towing, and Robert Douglas, a tow truck driver for Ed's Service Center, parked their tow trucks on North Business 71 in Willmar Tuesday afternoon to call attention to the dangers tow truck drivers face when assisting motorists.2 / 7
Carolyn Lange / Tribune Tow trucks lined North Business 71 in Willmar Tuesday afternoon to call attention to the dangers tow truck drivers face when assisting motorists.3 / 7
Carolyn Lange / Tribune Tow trucks lined North Business 71 in Willmar Tuesday afternoon to call attention to the dangers tow truck drivers face when assisting motorists.4 / 7
Carolyn Lange / Tribune Tow trucks lined North Business 71 in Willmar Tuesday afternoon to call attention to the dangers tow truck drivers face when assisting motorists.5 / 7
Carolyn Lange / Tribune Tow trucks lined North Business 71 in Willmar Tuesday afternoon. The demonstration was an effort to draw attention to the work of tow truck drivers and the law that requires motorists to move over.6 / 7
Carolyn Lange / Tribune Carolyn Lange / Tribune Tow trucks lined North Business 71 in Willmar Tuesday afternoon. The demonstration was an effort to draw attention to the work of tow truck drivers and the law that requires motorists to move over.7 / 7

WILLMAR — About a dozen tow trucks from the area lined North Business 71 in Willmar on Tuesday afternoon to remind motorists to slow down and move over when they see emergency vehicles on the side of the road.

Jason Butler, owner of City Line Towing of Willmar, said tow truck drivers are "on the side of the road every day" and putting their lives in danger.

The demonstration was an effort to draw attention to their work and the law that requires motorists to move over, Butler said, adding that he has been "touched by many mirrors" from passing vehicles as he was working on the side of the road.

Butler said it seems like "nobody pays attention to us" even though tow truck drivers are there to help.

The dangers of emergency personnel and law enforcement working on busy roads got statewide attention when a Wayzata police officer was killed Friday after being struck by a vehicle.

Faith Wilson, owner of Ed's Service Center, said tow truck drivers are also emergency crews and "it seems like people don't move over and don't slow down" unless a law enforcement officer is present.

She said oftentimes tow trucks are working without the assistance of law enforcement.

"We need help to keep our trucks and our drivers safe," Wilson said. "We're trying to help you get off of the highway, but we can't do that if you don't help us."

Carolyn Lange

A reporter for 35 years, Carolyn Lange covers regional news with the West Central Tribune.

(320) 894-9750
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