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October 21, 2018
The Clearwater County Courthouse was filled with spectators on Tuesday, Oct. 9, for the criminal case against three "valve turners" who disrupted the flow of oil in two Enbridge pipelines in 2016. The judge dismissed the case against the three defendants. Jordan Shearer / Forum News Service
Was it necessary? Parties weigh in on the criminal case involving Enbridge pipeline “valve turners”
October 21, 2018 - 6:05am
October 8, 2018
Minnesota scientists predict slower tree growth
October 8, 2018 - 7:25pm
September 12, 2018
Around Minnesota, winters just aren't as cold as they used to be. DNR climatologist Kenny Blumenfeld produced this graphic showing how Grand Rapids is losing its coldest temperature readings, which are usually collected overnight. The 1930s was something of an anomaly, he said, because the drought years caused colder temperatures. Source: Minnesota DNR
Experts say Minnesota's climate changing faster than other states
September 12, 2018 - 9:14am
April 5, 2018
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Senior Climatologist Kenneth Blumenfeld talks about climate change, history and projections with his “Climate Chaos in Minnesota” presentation at Central Lakes College in Brainerd on Wednesday, April 4. (Steve Kohls / Forum News Service)play button
'Warmer,' 'wetter,' 'extreme rainfall' trending in Minnesota: Climate change presentation at CLC raises concerns
April 5, 2018 - 3:24pm
December 29, 2017
After chilly forecast, Trump tweets US 'could use a little bit of that good old Global Warming'
December 29, 2017 - 7:07am
December 7, 2017
Glacier researchers at work on Gueshgue glacier, in the Cordillera Blanca region of Peru, Aug. 23, 2017. Accelerating glacial melt in the Andes caused by climate change has set off a gold rush downstream, but as the ice vanishes, the vast farms below may do the same. (Tomas Munita/The New York Times)
Study: Most accurate climate change models predict the most alarming consequences
December 7, 2017 - 8:16am
November 6, 2017
Illustration by Carli Greninger
The concerns of ag groups show just how much is at stake in the climate change debate
November 6, 2017 - 6:01am
October 21, 2017
Letter: Find your voice about climate change
October 21, 2017 - 12:27pm
October 20, 2017
A worker cuts down coffee trees damaged by the Roya coffee fungus to make way for new coffee plants near Santiago Atitlan, Guatemala, on Feb. 8, 2013. Bloomberg photo by Victor J. Blue.
Climate change could spell disaster for coffee, but science may offer a solution.
October 20, 2017 - 12:41pm
September 19, 2017
An aerial view of the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf, in Antarctica, in 2017. Scientists are racing to understand what is happening to the ice shelf as the planet warms around it. They are also trying to measure the role of human-caused climate change in weakening other parts of the West Antarctic ice sheet, and to fathom how damaging warming seas and changing wind patterns might ultimately prove to be. (Jonathan Corum/The New York Times)
New climate calculations could buy the Earth some time - if they're right
September 19, 2017 - 9:05am
August 29, 2017
Both a male and female Blue Grosbeak are staying in Cottage Grove this year. Ben Douglas / Special to Forum News Service
Southeastern Twin Cities metro birders treated to a year of rarities
August 29, 2017 - 10:55am
August 24, 2017
Wikicommons photo
Narwhals helping NASA understand melting ice
August 24, 2017 - 9:47am
August 10, 2017
The New York Times building in New York, Aug. 8, 2013. Robust digital growth powered The New York Times Company to one of its strongest quarters in recent years, as rising digital advertising revenue and new online subscriptions offset continued declines in print advertising. (Jabin Botsford/The New York Times)
New York Times guilty of large screw-up on climate-change story
August 10, 2017 - 2:14pm
August 8, 2017
New federal report finds strong link between climate change, human activity
August 8, 2017 - 9:31am
August 4, 2017
In an undated handout photo, the Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station, in Tasmania. The station, along with its counterparts across the world, has been flashing a warning: The excess carbon dioxide scorching the planet rose at the highest rate on record in 2015 and 2016. Scientists are concerned over the cause of the rapid rise, which may indicate the world’s natural sponges that absorb carbon dioxide have changed. (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization via The New York Times)
Extreme weather seen killing 152,000 Europeans a year by 2100
August 4, 2017 - 5:37pm
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