Annalise Braught

Annalise Braught

Editor & Photographer

Annalise is the editor and a photographer at the Bemidji Pioneer. She is a Mass Communication graduate from Bemidji State University. Her favorite pastime is exploring the great outdoors and capturing its natural beauty on camera. Contact Annalise at (218) 333-9796, (218) 358-1990 or abraught@bemidjipioneer.com.

A man has died after his vehicle fell through the Lake Bemidji ice on Friday evening.
Conducted every fall ahead of hunting season, the results of the deer surveys are given to the city to help with the number of licenses given out for the archery hunt to help control the deer population. It also allows students to get experience working in the field.
Sylvia White of Park Rapids is dead after her SUV collided with a fertilizer trailer on Friday afternoon on U.S. Highway 71, south of Bemidji.
At approximately 3:25 p.m. Sunday, the Beltrami County Sheriff’s Office received a report from a male subject stating he had been shot at a residence in Turtle River Township, about 9 miles northeast of Bemidji.
Two recent accidents on County Highway 9 in Eckles Township left two men dead, leading some to revisit the safety of the recently reconstructed roadway.
According to court documents, Robin Lee Lussier, also known as Ratchet, 32; Willard Duane Reed, III, also known as Left or Leftfield, 26; and Joshua Adam Hanks, also known as Souless, 25; were active members of the Native Mob gang. The gang is a criminal enterprise whose members and associates engage in and have engaged in acts of violence, including murder, attempted murder, robbery and assault.
Officers from 31 different law enforcement agencies assisted in the removal of the demonstrators from private property. A total of 179 demonstrators were arrested and charged with gross misdemeanor trespassing with an additional 68 individuals cited with public nuisance and unlawful assembly.
A 1-year-old boy died in a house fire near Walker on Friday morning, with four others escaping unharmed, according to a release from Cass County Sheriff Tom Burch.
Ordinarily, participants would march, but due to COVID-19 and certain event activities, this year’s event was a stationary one at Paul Bunyan Park.
Several of the protesters locked themselves together, wearing “sleeping dragon” devices, attaching themselves to one another -- many lying on the ground in sleeping bags for warmth, while others were also locked to the fences outside of the entrances. The Minnesota State Patrol used saws to cut through the devices, which appeared to be made with reinforced metal bars.