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Apple says iPhone 'touch disease' problem not covered by warranty

LOS ANGELES--Apple has a solution for iPhone 6 Plus owners that are experiencing an unresponsive touch screen, a phenomenon that's been dubbed "touch disease," but the company's help comes with a price tag attached: Apple's new multi-touch repair...

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A man inspects the Apple iPhone 6 Plus at an electronics store in Mumbai, India, July 23, 2015. (REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui)

LOS ANGELES-Apple has a solution for iPhone 6 Plus owners that are experiencing an unresponsive touch screen, a phenomenon that's been dubbed "touch disease," but the company's help comes with a price tag attached: Apple's new multi-touch repair program offers a fix for affected devices for $149, according to a new support document.

Reports about the issue first surfaced this summer. Some iPhone 6 Plus device owners have been experiencing a flicker on the top of their screen that coincides with a gradual loss in touch screen responsiveness. At worst, affected devices can stop responding to touch input altogether.

Repair site iFixit highlighted the issue in a video in August, and also pointed to what it called a design defect as a possible culprit: The iPhone 6 Plus uses less rigid shielding for its innards, making them more susceptible to bending and other forms of outside force.

However, Apple seems to out the blame for the problem squarely on iPhone 6 owners. "Some iPhone 6 Plus devices may exhibit display flickering or Multi-Touch issues after being dropped multiple times on a hard surface and then incurring further stress on the device," the company writes in its support document.

That's also why the company isn't covering "touch disease" issues under its warranty. However, the $149 repair still is cheaper than the fix would be under Apple's usual repair rates.

Related Topics: TECHNOLOGY
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