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John Wheeler

John Wheeler

Meteorologist

John Wheeler is Chief Meteorologist for WDAY, a position he has had since May of 1985. Wheeler grew up in the South, in Louisiana and Alabama, and cites his family's move to the Midwest as important to developing his fascination with weather and climate. Wheeler lived in Wisconsin and Iowa as a teenager. He attended Iowa State University and achieved a B.S. degree in Meteorology in 1984. Wheeler worked about a year at WOI-TV in central Iowa before moving to Fargo and WDAY..

Wheeler covers weather for WDAY TV and radio, as well as for The Forum and for inforum.com. Most meteorologists find stormy and extreme weather fascinating and Wheeler is no exception, but his biggest interest is severe winter weather.

For the first time, we will see galaxies that formed shortly after the beginning of time
Blowing snow is an ideal way of getting ice crystals airborne.
StormTRACKER Meteorologist John Wheeler looks at February weather
Records suggest that snowfalls of up to 4 feet are possible, although rare
Mild weather in the western High Plains is related to the slope of the land.
The water equivalent of the snow pack is one to four inches, which is near average.
The average number of blizzards in a winter is three.
Strong eruptions in the tropics have been known to cause cooling due to large amounts of sulphur dioxide being placed into the upper atmosphere.
A modest shift could easily leave our region with more air from the southwest and with much milder and drier weather.
It is very difficult to predict the wind's ability to lift old snow and make it airborne.