ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Corps to increase flows from Lac qui Parle Dam

WATSON -- Recent rains and high water levels have led the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to continue to increase flows from Lac qui Parle Dam. The dam is located on the Minnesota River in west central Minnesota near Watson. The region received near...

Tribune file photoContinued rains and high water levels have led the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to continue to increase the discharge from the Lac qui Parle dam. This photo from the summer shows discharge at the dam into the Minnesota River.
Tribune file photo Continued rains and high water levels have led the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to continue to increase the discharge from the Lac qui Parle dam. This photo from the summer shows discharge at the dam into the Minnesota River.

WATSON - Recent rains and high water levels have led the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to continue to increase flows from Lac qui Parle Dam.

The dam is located on the Minnesota River in west central Minnesota near Watson.

The region received nearly an inch of rain over the weekend and that, coupled with snow melt, resulted in a significant increase of flows into the reservoir, necessitating the need to increase discharges through the dam, said a news release from the Corps' St. Paul District.

Flows were increased Tuesday to 2,500 cubic feet per second and then to 3,000 on Wednesday. Current inflows are at 3,000 cubic feet per second but are forecast to reach 4,500 or more by Friday. Normal November inflow is 350 cubic feet per second.

The Corps engineers discovered a sinkhole on the downstream dam embankment Oct. 28. While assessing the sinkhole, divers found scouring under the abutment wall footings and concrete dam apron. None of these issues are an imminent threat to the integrity of the dam.

ADVERTISEMENT

While outflows from the dam will be increased, the lake elevation will increase also. The pool's current elevation is 933.6 feet, but is forecast to increase to 937 to 938 feet by the middle of December. Normal pool elevation for this time of year is 934 feet.

What To Read Next
Mike Clemens, a farmer from Wimbledon, North Dakota, was literally (and figuratively) “blown away,” when his equipment shed collapsed under a snow load.
Volunteers lead lessons on infusing fibers with plant dyes and journaling scientific observations for youth in Crow Wing and Olmsted counties.
The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission met on Jan. 5, 2023, to consider the application for Summit Carbon Solutions.
Qualified Minnesota farmers will receive dollar-for-dollar matching money to purchase farmland.