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District 16 legislators back leadership, question Miller group's mini-caucus move

GRANITE FALLS -- Two Republican state legislators from District 16 will continue to support their party's leadership, despite a move by four members of the party to create a separate caucus in the House.

Rep. Tim Miller
Rep. Tim Miller, R-Prinsburg
Contributed/Minnesota House of Representatives

GRANITE FALLS - Two Republican state legislators from District 16 will continue to support their party's leadership, despite a move by four members of the party to create a separate caucus in the House.

Representative Chris Swedzinski, R-Ghent, and State Senator Gary Dahms, R-Redwood Falls, said they continue to support the current leadership when asked their thoughts on the New Republican mini-caucus created by Representatives Tim Miller of Prinsburg, Steve Drazkowski of Mazeppa, Cal Bahr of East Bethel and Jeremy Munson of Lake Crystal. They spoke at a town hall meeting on Thursday in Granite Falls.

Swedzinski said he continues to expect good things from the party leadership and is not sure what the four will accomplish by creating their separate caucus.

Swedzinski questioned Miller's decision to join the separate caucus after an unsuccessful effort to run for the speaker position held by Kurt Daudt, Crown. "You run to get the job and people don't agree with you. You leave. I don't agree with that,'' he said.

The Republican party lost its majority in the House in the midterm election, but held on to the Senate by a one-member margin.

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Dahms said there's a tendency to focus too much on one or two top leaders and expect them to get everyone re-elected. "It's everybody's job,'' he said. "It's not fair to point your finger at the speaker and say it is his fault,'' he said.

The state senator said he felt that a variety of factors and issues, and not a single individual, was responsible for the election outcome.

Related Topics: GRANITE FALLS
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