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Feb. 21 is deadline for livestock grants from state of MN

ST. PAUL -- Minnesota Agriculture Commissioner Dave Frederickson has announced that $1 million in grant funding is being made available to livestock producers in the state for on-farm improvements.

ST. PAUL - Minnesota Agriculture Commissioner Dave Frederickson has announced that $1 million in grant funding is being made available to livestock producers in the state for on-farm improvements.
The Livestock Investment Grants help farmers stay competitive and reinvest in their industry. The 237 grant recipients to date have invested an estimated $75 million in upgrades to their operations since the program began in 2008.
The deadline to apply for this year’s grant program is Feb. 21.
Qualifying producers would be reimbursed 10 percent of the first $500,000 of investment, with a minimum investment of $4,000. Qualifying expenditures include the purchase, construction or improvement of buildings or facilities for the production of livestock, and the purchase of fencing as well as feeding and waste management equipment. Producers who suffered a loss due to a natural disaster or unintended consequence may also apply. The grant will not pay for livestock or land purchases or for the cost of debt refinancing.
Minnesota livestock producers who applied for but did not receive a grant in past years will need to reapply to be considered for the 2014 program. These grants are incentives to start projects and will not be awarded to works in progress. Grants will be competitively funded based on how well applicants score.
More information on the Minnesota Livestock Investment Program can be found on the Minnesota Department of Agriculture website at www.mda.state.mn.us/livestockinvestmentgrant .

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