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Four snowmobilers break through thin ice

GARRISON -- Four people broke through the ice and a man spent about an hour in the cold waters of a northern Minnesota lake Saturday before emergency personnel rescued him.The Crow Wing County Sheriff's Office responded to a call of two people br...

GARRISON - Four people broke through the ice and a man spent about an hour in the cold waters of a northern Minnesota lake Saturday before emergency personnel rescued him.
The Crow Wing County Sheriff's Office responded to a call of two people broken through the ice on Partridge Lake near Garrison about 5 p.m. Saturday. Steven Truehart, 30, of Brooklyn Park, and Heather Gillen, 33, of Gilbert, Arizona, were among a group riding snowmobiles on the lake.
Crow Wing County sheriff's deputies, the Garrison Fire Department and a Cuyuna Regional Medical Center ambulance crew found Truehart in the water about 100 yards from the eastern shore of the lake. Three firefighters, all wearing cold water rescue suits, rescued Truehart by breaking a path in the ice and pulling him safely to shore. Deputies learned that Truehart and Gillen were riding snowmobiles on the lake when Truehart’s snowmobile broke through the ice. Gillen stopped the snowmobile she was riding near the west shoreline of the lake and attempted to assist Truehart, but Gillen broke through the ice before reaching Truehart.
A family member went looking for Gillen and Truehart and found both in the water. Family members pulled Gillen from the water, but could not get to Truehart.
While trying to get to Truehart, a family member on another snowmobile also broke through the ice. Both riders of that snowmobile, 57-year-old Juliane Bromley of Deerwood, and 60-year-old Peter Gillen of Maple Grove, got out safely.
Both Bromley and Truehart were taken by ambulance to Cuyuna Regional Medical Center in Crosby and treated for cold exposure.
Crow Wing County Sheriff Todd Dahl said ice conditions on lakes in the area are unpredictable, unsafe and even with recent colder temperatures, it remains very dangerous.

Related Topics: ACCIDENTSGARRISON
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