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Heat wave keeps rolling over Minnesota

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -- Minnesota was bracing for another sweltering day Monday, with heat advisories in effect through the evening in most of the south, central and northeast part of the state.

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -- Minnesota was bracing for another sweltering day Monday, with heat advisories in effect through the evening in most of the south, central and northeast part of the state.

The National Weather Service was predicting highs near 100 in central and south Minnesota, and about 90 in the northwest. The heat index, a measure of temperature plus humidity, was expected to approach 105 to 110 on Monday in the Twin Cities.

It was 87 degrees at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport at 9 a.m. If it hits 100, it will be the first day at the century mark since July 1995. Monday was shaping up like the Twin Cities' ninth consecutive day above 90 and the 17th in July.

Officials cautioned people to drink plenty of fluids, not to overexert themselves, and check on the elderly and those who don't have air conditioning.

Nate Olson, 20, was out Monday morning cleaning sewers for the city of Bloomington, a suburb of Minneapolis. Wearing jeans, a reflective vest and a short sleeve shirt, he said, ``the past week's been pretty bad.'

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Last week, one of the workers on his crew got sick in the heat was taking a couple of days off, but Olson said he would be working until 3:30 p.m. ``I have a big water jug,' he said. ``You just have to keep drinking all day long.'

It was an especially hot morning for about 1,700 Xcel Energy customers who were without power at 9 a.m. Monday. The figure was down from about 8,300 outages on Sunday as the power grid strained to keep up the air conditioners humming.

Northern Minnesota is expecting temperatures in the lower to mid-90s Monday. The highs in Duluth could reach 95, breaking the record 93 degrees for the day, said Peter Parke, meteorologist in the northern Minnesota city.

A break was in the forecast, however. The weather service said there was a 40 percent chance of thunderstorms late Monday, and a 50 percent chance Tuesday.

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