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Investigation ongoing into Olivia building fire

OLIVIA -- Two Olivia businesses will need to find new facilities after a Thursday afternoon fire destroyed the building that housed them. The Olivia and Bird Island fire departments were dispatched around 4 p.m. to a fire at the building located ...

OLIVIA -- Two Olivia businesses will need to find new facilities after a Thursday afternoon fire destroyed the building that housed them.

The Olivia and Bird Island fire departments were dispatched around 4 p.m. to a fire at the building located at 307 East Lincoln Ave, near U.S. Highway 212. One Dollar Deals and Schultz Machine Shop operated from the building.

Capt. Aaron Thompson, with the Olivia Fire Department, said an official with the Minnesota State Fire Marshal's Office will investigate the cause of the blaze. "We'll let them make the determination," Thompson said.

According to the Renville County Dispatch, an ambulance was dispatched to the scene at around 5:15 p.m. Thompson said he believed one person was transported by ambulance after suffering minor burns. Dispatch would not release any further information about the fire as of press time.

Thompson said the whole building was intact with smoke exiting it when firefighters arrived on scene. By 6 p.m., the roof of the building was destroyed. He said it was too dangerous for firefighters to enter the building.

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"Usually, you can get down low and you can see. You couldn't see nothing," he said.

Firefighters were able to knock down an exterior wall to prevent the flames from spreading. The closest building to the fire was a shed located to the south, however, the wind was blowing north.

Traffic on Highway 212 was detoured four blocks until 6:30 p.m., and the smoke from the fire could be seen on U.S. Highway 71 up to 10 miles away.

According to Olivia Mayor Bill Miller, One Dollar Deals had operated from the north side of the building for about four or five years. Schultz Machine Shop operated from the south side for about 10 to 15 years.

The fire remains under investigation.

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