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Jennie-O Turkey Store shares bonus with employees

WILLMAR -- Jennie-O Turkey Store employees are going into the holidays with plenty of cheer. The company announced on Tuesday that a record payment of over $13 million has been distributed to employees as a discretionary bonus based on the compan...

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WILLMAR - Jennie-O Turkey Store employees are going into the holidays with plenty of cheer.

The company announced on Tuesday that a record payment of over $13 million has been distributed to employees as a discretionary bonus based on the company's record performance this past year.

This amount equals an average payment of over $2,000 per eligible employee, with newly hired employees receiving at least $525.

"This year we have been integrating our new cultural beliefs program into the way our team functions on a daily basis. These beliefs are safety first, results matter, speak up, build bridges, challenge yourself, create solutions and grow talent. Because 'results matter,' Jennie-O Turkey Store turned in record company earnings for our recently completed fiscal year and gives us the opportunity to share a record discretionary cash award with our team members in recognition of their contributions," said Glenn Leitch, president, in an announcement by the company.

Those eligible for the bonus include approximately 6,400 hourly and farm employees across all of the company's operations in Minnesota and Wisconsin who were employed when the company's most recent fiscal year ended on October 30 and when the checks were distributed today.

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Hormel Foods and its subsidiaries have a legacy of sharing success with employees through programs such as profit sharing, discretionary bonus awards and other performance bonuses, which are based on the company's performance.

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