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Letter: Low-income housing fear

There seemed to me to be a real bottom-line concern by many who attended the overflowing Planning Commission hearing last week on what low-income housing will do to property values in southwest Willmar.

There seemed to me to be a real bottom-line concern by many who attended the overflowing Planning Commission hearing last week on what low-income housing will do to property values in southwest Willmar.

Attending as a resident near the affected area, I thought David Little reported the meeting well (Jan. 10 issue), but I was struck by the underlying fear, by those of means, of the possibility of losing equity value in their surrounding properties (which I do not think will happen, unless people panic-sell.) This is in contrast to the working poor who, if they could have afforded to attend, would likely have expressed a real concern (fear) of not meeting their basic economic needs.

Though the question before the meeting technically was not about the disparity between the haves and have-nots, I came away with the impression that the "haves" did not want (for various reasons as reported) any "have-nots" nearby for fear of what they will do to "my property" -- as though we know what will happen -- which, in my mind, is what will happen if we inadvertently continue to support the growing gap between the rich and the poor. For their part, the Planning Commission made the correct recommendation to the City Council.

Charles O. Miller

Willmar

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