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MnDOT converts to LED roadway lights

ST. PAUL -- More than 28,500 roadway lights along Minnesota roads and bridges will be replaced with LED lights over the next four years.The conversion from traditional high-pressure sodium lights to LED lights is expected to save the state up to ...

ST. PAUL - More than 28,500 roadway lights along Minnesota roads and bridges will be replaced with LED lights over the next four years.
The conversion from traditional high-pressure sodium lights to LED lights is expected to save the state up to $1.45 million a year in energy costs and an additional $500,000 a year in maintenance and replacement costs for the light fixtures and bulbs.
“Drivers will see whiter light, but the biggest impacts will be a large reduction in the energy bill and eliminating the cost of bulb replacement every four years,” said Michael Gerbensky, a signal design and lighting management engineer from the Minnesota Department of Transportation.
The LED lights are expected to last about 100,000 hours, or an average of 18 years.
“This means having our maintenance personnel out on the roadway less often, which reduces traffic control costs and it means improved safety,” Gerbensky said. “That savings can go to preserving our roadways.”
The new lights are being installed mainly on bridges and roadways.
Other areas - such as weigh stations, rest areas, tunnels and maintenance facilities - are also being considered.
About 10,000 lights are in Greater Minnesota with the rest in the Twin Cities Metro area.
Installations in the Twin Cities will be completed by the end of this year.
In Greater Minnesota, the conversion will take longer because of the large geographical area, but the entire conversion is expected to be complete by 2020, according to the Minnesota Department of Transportation.

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