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MnDOT to begin drainage repair and resurfacing of U.S. Highway 12 in Willmar

The Minnesota Department of Transportation will start work on the drainage repair and resurfacing of U.S. Highway 12, with an expected completion around the end of August.

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The Minnesota Department of Transportation will start work on the drainage repair and resurfacing of U.S. Highway 12. The project is expected to be completed by the end of August. Map courtesy of the Minnesota Department of Transportation

WILLMAR — The Minnesota Department of Transportation will start work on scheduled drainage repair of U.S. Highway 12 beginning July 19 in Willmar in advance of a resurfacing project.

Crews will repair catch basins along Highway 12 from Sixth Street Southeast to 24th Street Southeast.

The project cost is tied to asphalt resurfacing project west of Willmar on Highway 12. The combined total project cost is $1.3 million.

The drainage repair portion of the project will take about one week to complete. Motorists can expect lane closures during the resurfacing.

The asphalt resurfacing portion of the project is scheduled to get underway the first week of August.

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Work is scheduled to be complete by the end of August.

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Work zone travel

MnDOT advises travelers to always slow down when approaching every work zone, then navigate through with care and caution. Other reminders:

  • Never enter a roadway that has been blocked with barriers or cones

  • Stay alert; work zones constantly change

  • Watch for workers and slow-moving equipment

  • Obey posted speed limits; fine for a work zone violation is $300

  • Minimize distractions behind the wheel

  • Be patient; expect delays, especially during peak travel times

Tim Speier joined the Brainerd Dispatch in October 2021, covering Public Safety.
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