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Montevideo Police hope to solve year-old murder case

MONTEVIDEO -- Today is the one year anniversary of a homicide in Montevideo that remains unsolved, although authorities remain hopeful of resolving the case.

homas Dickson’s apartment i
Markings were visible on the door of Thomas Dickson’s apartment in Montevideo the day following his murder. Montevideo Police remain hopeful of solving the year-old case. (TRIBUNE/File)

MONTEVIDEO - Today is the one year anniversary of a homicide in Montevideo that remains unsolved, although authorities remain hopeful of resolving the case.
It was on this date around 10:15 p.m. that Montevideo Police found the body of Thomas Dickson, 64, in his upstairs apartment in a building on Canyon Avenue, one block from the city’s Main Street.
The Bureau of Criminal Apprehension crime lab was called, and Dickson’s body was sent to the Ramsey County Medical Examiner.
The death, initially termed suspicious, was ruled a homicide one week later.
One year later, the investigation remains active. Montevideo Police Chief Adam Christopher said he hopes that charges will eventually be brought forward in the death.
Montevideo Police officers and agents with the Minnesota BCA continue to work on the case. Christopher said they received good leads in the case and have good information, but time is still needed.
“It’s like a puzzle,’’ he said of the investigation. “(We’re) trying to put all the pieces together.’’
Authorities have determined how Dickson died, but are not releasing information on the cause. The chief said releasing the information at this point could jeopardize the investigation and ability to collect additional evidence.
The victim had been working at Chandler Industries, but was not well known in the community. He had moved to the Montevideo area from the Twin Cities a few years earlier. He was originally from the New York state area.
Dickson had limited contact with family. Police were able to locate a brother of his in Texas, but the brother said he had not had contact with the victim for 30 years.
Dickson was a military veteran, and his body is interred at Fort Snelling National Cemetery in Minneapolis.

Related Topics: CRIME
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