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U.S. Supreme Court's Breyer will officially retire on Thursday

Breyer, 83, has served on the court since 1994 and announced his plans to retire in January. He will retire at noon on Thursday shortly after the court issues the last of its rulings of its current term. Jackson is set to become the first Black woman to serve on the nation's top judicial body.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer attends event for 2022 Supreme Court Fellows Program
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer speaks on Feb. 17 during an event at the Library of Congress for the 2022 Supreme Court Fellows Program hosted by the Law Library of Congress, in Washington.
Pool / Reuters
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WASHINGTON -- Liberal U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer will officially retire on Thursday, paving the way for President Joe Biden's appointee Ketanji Brown Jackson to be sworn in to the lifetime position to replace him, the court said on Wednesday.

Breyer, 83, has served on the court since 1994 and announced his plans to retire in January. He will retire at noon on Thursday shortly after the court issues the last of its rulings of its current term. Jackson is set to become the first Black woman to serve on the nation's top judicial body.

"It has been my great honor to participate as a judge in the effort to maintain our Constitution and the Rule of Law," Breyer said in a letter to Biden.

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