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Olivia, Minn., to host 'Farm to School' documentary showing Tuesday

OLIVIA -- A screening and discussion of the new documentary, "Farm to School: Growing Our Future," is scheduled for 2 p.m. Tuesday at the Renville County Government Services building in Olivia.

OLIVIA -- A screening and discussion of the new documentary, "Farm to School: Growing Our Future," is scheduled for 2 p.m. Tuesday at the Renville County Government Services building in Olivia.

The documentary showcases Farm to School in Minnesota and includes success stories as well as challenges that stunt the growth of Farm to School, according to a news release from Redwood-Renville County Public Health Services.

The Farm to School initiative serves fresh, local foods in schools, teaches students about the foods they eat and grows local economies. It connects schools with nearby farmers so that schools can buy fresh fruits, vegetables and other foods directly from local farmers.

The 30-minute television documentary was produced as a partnership between University of Minnesota Extension, the Minnesota Department of Health and Twin Cities Public Television with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The screening in Olivia is one of about a dozen regional screenings and discussions scheduled around Minnesota this spring encouraging communities to start talking about ways to grow Farm to School partnerships. Members of the public interested in Farm to School are invited, but must register at www.extension.umn.edu .

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For more details about the screening on April 24 in Olivia, go to http://www.extension.umn.edu/farm-to-school/documentary/screenings.html or call Michelle Breidenbach at 320-523-3784.

Related Topics: OLIVIAHEALTHEDUCATION
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