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Spring road restrictions begin Thursday in Kandiyohi County

A sure sign of spring is activation of weight limits on roads. They go into effect Thursday in Kandiyohi County and also on many state roads.

2021 Spring Road Restrictions Map.Kandiyohi County.jpg
A map of the 2021 Spring Road Restrictions in Kandiyohi County. Kandiyohi County Public Works Department

WILLMAR – Seasonal load restrictions begin Thursday in Kandiyohi County.

The countywide restrictions, which go into effect at 12:01 a.m., protect roads during the spring thaw, when road strength is at its lowest point of the year.

By state law, all non-posted county paved roads are open to a normal, 10-ton per axle load and all non-posted township roads and county gravel roads are restricted to a 5-ton per axle load limitation.

However, most county gravel roads are posted to a higher, 7-ton per axle load limit and will be posted accordingly.

Weight limits may change during the thaw period depending on the condition of a roadway, according to Todd Miller, maintenance engineer with the Kandiyohi County Public Works Department. Changes will be posted and will govern the legal weight on the roadway.

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Motorists are encouraged to check for a posted limit to make sure they are in compliance. There will be no overweight permits issued in the county during this time, according to Miller.

Additional information, including a map showing the axle load restrictions on county roads, can be found at www.kcmn.us and clicking on public works, followed by spring axle load limits and then info or map.

The Minnesota Department of Transportation is also starting spring load restrictions in the south, southeast and metro frost zones on Thursday and the central frost zone on Friday. Kandiyohi County straddles the southern and central frost zones.

Carolyn Lange is a features writer at the West Central Tribune. She can be reached at clange@wctrib.com or 320-894-9750
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