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State finishes Clark shooting probe

ST. PAUL -- The state has finished its investigation into the Nov. 15 shooting death of a young black Minneapolis man at the hands of a police officer, but details remain secret.The report is in the hands of Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman,...

ST. PAUL - The state has finished its investigation into the Nov. 15 shooting death of a young black Minneapolis man at the hands of a police officer, but details remain secret.
The report is in the hands of Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman, who will review it and perhaps present it to a grand jury for possible charges.
Details from the report, including videos of the scene, likely will remain secret for some time.
Federal investigations continue, and authorities involved in them have said videos should not be released until their work is done. Black Lives Matter Minneapolis and others in the city’s black community have demanded release of the videos since shortly after the shooting. They claim 24-year-old Jamar Clark was handcuffed when shot by a white police officer, while the police union says he was not handcuffed and he had his hand on an officer’s gun during the early-morning struggle that resulted in an officer shooting him once in the head. The Bureau of Criminal Apprehension announced Wednesday that it has concluded its investigation, but Freeman’s office actually received the case Tuesday. That was the day the Minneapolis NAACP and American Civil Liberties Union chapters filed a lawsuit demanding release of Clark videos.

Freeman’s office released a statement saying that its review may lead to further investigation, and the county attorney said he would like to decide about whether to bring charges by the end of March.
Videos and other material gathered in the investigation could be released after a trial or sooner if a decision is made not to charge the officer involved.
Law enforcement officials have said none of the videos from the scene show the entire incident. Gov. Mark Dayton said he saw one video, which he called inconclusive.
Videos were examined from an ambulance, a nearby security camera, a mobile police camera and mobile telephones. No videos are available from police cars or police body cameras.
Minneapolis NAACP President Nekima Levy-Pounds told reporters Tuesday that the longer the videos are kept from the public, the larger the divide will be between Minneapolis police and the black community.
Black Lives Matter Minneapolis occupied a city police station in protest of the Clark shooting until police ousted them. Since then, the group demonstrated at Mall of America and the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, as well as at less prominent venues.

Related Topics: BLACK LIVES MATTERCRIME
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