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The Vault: An interview with James Wolner of 'Dakota Spotlight' Part 1

In the first of this two-part series, Forum Communications journalist and fellow podcaster Tracy Briggs asks the questions you've always wanted to know, including how Wolner, a California native ended up in North Dakota.

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James Wolner is one of Forum Communications' most popular podcasters. His podcast, "Dakota Spotlight" has listeners around the globe, addicted to his low-key storytelling about some of the most mysterious and puzzling true crimes in the Midwest.

In the first of this two-part series, Forum Communications journalist and fellow podcaster Tracy Briggs asks the questions you've always wanted to know, including how Wolner, a California native ended up a small North Dakota town, what drew him to true crime storytelling and what drives him to work tirelessly at it.

James also gives listeners some behind-the-scenes details from previous seasons and the latest on "A Better Search for Barbara," the podcast that reignited the discussion and investigation about a 15-year-old girl from Williston, N.D., who went missing in 1981.

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Related Topics: DAKOTA SPOTLIGHTTRUE CRIME
Tracy Briggs is a News, Lifestyle and History reporter with Forum Communications with more than 30 years of experience.
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