ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Twin Cities’ growth tops 3 million

ST. PAUL -- The Twin Cities metro is growing faster than most other areas in the Midwest, but still not as fast as Denver, Portland or Seattle. The Metropolitan Council released its analysis Thursday of new U.S. Census Bureau population estimates...

Minnesota
New census estimates show there were 185,669 more Minnesota residents last year than in 2010. Eighty-eight percent of those people live in the metro area. (File | Tribune)

ST. PAUL -- The Twin Cities metro is growing faster than most other areas in the Midwest, but still not as fast as Denver, Portland or Seattle.

The Metropolitan Council released its analysis Thursday of new U.S. Census Bureau population estimates.

With an estimated population of 3.01 million residents as of July, the seven-county metro area has for the first time eclipsed 3 million.

According to the Met Council, much of the growth can be attributed to births and people living longer (births outpaced deaths), and about a third is due to international immigration.

The metro population has grown by more than 162,000 people since April 1, 2010, a 5.7 percent increase. Outside the Twin Cities, the state population grew by less than 1 percentage point.

ADVERTISEMENT

The U.S. Census examined the broader 16-county statistical area that stretches to Mille Lacs County in the north, Sibley County in the southwest and Pierce and St. Croix counties in Wisconsin.

That region ranks as the nation’s 17th fastest-growing major metropolitan area. With growth rates of 12.4 percent to 9.4 percent, respectively, Houston, Orlando, Denver, San Antonio and Dallas-Fort Worth make up the top five.

The Twin Cities metro was the third fastest-growing region in the Midwest following Columbus and Indianapolis, according to the Met Council.

The Pioneer Press is a Forum News Service media partner.

What To Read Next
Fundraising is underway to move the giant ball of twine from the Highland, Wisconsin, home of creator James Frank Kotera, who died last month at age 75, 44 years after starting the big ball.
Mike Clemens, a farmer from Wimbledon, North Dakota, was literally (and figuratively) “blown away,” when his equipment shed collapsed under a snow load.
Volunteers lead lessons on infusing fibers with plant dyes and journaling scientific observations for youth in Crow Wing and Olmsted counties.