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Tick season is in full swing. Find out what to do if a tick bites you

Ticks are out and waiting to hitch a ride and grab a bite. Out of you. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams has tips on what you should do if a tick bites you.

Ticks
Ticks can transmit diseases, including Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
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ROCHESTER, Minn. — It is tick season again. I know that firsthand, as one of the little critters crawled across my face when I was gardening.

Some ticks carry bacteria that transmit diseases, such as Lyme disease or Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. If you find a tick attached to your skin, the Mayo Clinic News Network has an article with suggestions as to who to do:

  • Remove the tick carefully and as soon as possible. Use fine tipped tweezers to pull the entire tick out without twisting it. Don't use petroleum jelly, fingernail polish or a hot match.
  • Save it in a sealed container if possible in case a health care provider wants to see it.
  • Wash your hands and the bite with warm soapy water or rubbing alcohol.

Call your health care provider if:

  • You can't remove all of the tick.
  • You develop a rash that gets bigger.
  • You get a fever or flu-like symptoms.
  • You think you may have been bitten by a deer tick.

Call 911 if you develop:

  • A severe headache
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Paralysis
  • Heart palpitations

Antibiotics can be very effective against Lyme disease, so don't delay seeing your healthcare provider.

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Follow the  Health Fusion podcast on  Apple,   Spotify and  Google podcasts. For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at  vwilliams@newsmd.com. Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

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