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Cal Thomas: Is Merrick Garland serious?

From the commentary: Whatever one thinks of Trump's character, he is entitled to the same presumption of innocence as any other American. Trump always suffers from a presumption of guilt.

Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit held at the Tampa Convention Center on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Florida.
Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit held at the Tampa Convention Center on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Florida.
(Joe Raedle/Getty Images/TNS)
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Commenting about the FBI executing a search warrant on former president Donald Trump's Florida home, which he approved, Attorney General Merrick Garland said: "Faithful adherence to the rule of law is the bedrock principle of the Justice Department and of our democracy. ... All Americans are entitled to the even-handed application of the law, to due process, and to the presumption of innocence."

Cal Thomas commentary
Cal Thomas Commentary
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Summary: I once heard the late evangelist Rev. Billy Graham say America was not at a crossroads, but had traveled down the wrong road and needed to come back to the crossroads and take the right road. What if we can no longer agree on the right road and where the wrong road is leading us?
Summary: Donald Trump would do well to withdraw from the field and allow younger and less controversial candidates to replace him. His record of policy successes while president are undeniable (except for those in denial), but his narcissistic personality contributed to his loss. It is also contributing to the work of the January 6 committee. If that committee wishes to "bring us together," it will forgo recommendations of criminal prosecution and let voters decide, as they should and ultimately will, the future of Donald Trump.
Summary: When rhetoric gets heated, perhaps the best way to be heard is to speak in a tone Scripture attributes to God — "a still, small voice." As noted by the writer of Proverbs: "A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. (Proverbs 15:1)
Summary: Many viewers might want to know why Congress can't seem to fix any of the country's real problems. That perennial question is why increasing numbers of Americans have grown sour about Washington. They see members of Congress more interested in re-election, in their careers and in perks than in the people they are supposed to represent.

None of this applies to the way the Department of Justice, the FBI and most of the media have treated Donald Trump.

From the Steele Dossier, Russia "collusion," the labeling of Trump as a Russian "asset," the Mueller Report, and the refusal by the Biden administration to enforce our immigration laws, the Justice Department in this administration has done just the opposite when it comes to equal application of the law and due process.

Whatever one thinks of Trump's character, he is entitled to the same presumption of innocence as any other American. Trump always suffers from a presumption of guilt. He is forced to continually prove he is innocent of charges, often made by "sources" who leak information to anti-Trump media, or must explain himself to hostile Democrats (and a few hostile Republicans).

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The specter of armed federal agents outside Trump's Florida home is not an image I suspect many of us are comfortable with. Even those who do not like Trump and hope he does not run for president in 2024 should be alarmed at how this focus on him is contributing to what has been a long slide in the trust Americans place in our institutions.

In 1973, when the Gallup organization began polling on the subject, 42 percent of respondents had a "great deal/quite a lot" of confidence in Congress. This year that number is just 7 percent.

In 1991, 73 percent of the public had a great deal/quite a lot of confidence in the presidency. This year only 23 percent feel that way.

More Commentary:
From the commentary: ... The question of whether state courts should enforce state constitutional protections of voting rights should be easy to answer with a resounding yes. That it is an open question is clearly what troubled the conference of chief justices, and rightly so.
From the commentary: Even in a season marked by unpredictability, some things never change. Politics is still a street fight. And it never hurts to get in the first punch.
From the commentary: You can understand why secular progressives hate Italy's new leader Giorgia Meloni and fear her message. Perhaps she will soon visit the U.S. and put some backbone into the Republican Party.

Confidence in the criminal justice system has reached a new low with just 14 percent coming down on the side of great deal/quite a lot. Is it any wonder with stories of woke prosecutors freeing criminals with low or no bail only to see many of them commit new crimes?

In what should be a warning to the media - a warning that has been apparent for many years--confidence in the trustworthiness of newspapers has declined from a high of 51 percent in 1979, to a record low of 16 percent today. Confidence in TV news reflects a similar drop - from 46 percent in 1993, to the current 11 percent. Perhaps some introspection by the media as to the "root causes" might be beneficial to the profession and the public.

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Gallup has recorded similar declines in confidence levels for other institutions, including the church (no wonder with all the scandals and some TV evangelists still living the lifestyles of potentates as opposed to that of the One they claim to follow). It may surprise many that the police, which have been under heavy assault from various liberal groups, continue to enjoy major support. Gallup found 45 percent have a great deal/quite a lot of confidence in the police, down only from 52 percent in 1993.

No foreign power could hope to undermine the pillars of our democracy better than we are doing ourselves. Serious attention to rebuilding these and other institutions, which can lead to restoring confidence in them, is urgently required.

This Cal Thomas commentary is his opinion. He can be reached at cthomas@wctrib.com.

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Related Topics: COMMENTARYDONALD TRUMP
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