“It is better to keep your mouth closed and let people think you are a fool than to open it and remove all doubt.” - Mark Twain.

 

Newsletter signup for email alerts

That  is exactly what happened Tuesday when a city-boy legislator attempted to comment upon Minnesota’s highlly pathogenic avian flu outbreak.

 

State Rep. Ron Erhardt, DFL-Edina, Tuesday afternoon arose on the Minnesota House floor dressed in a white lab coat, according to a Forum News Service report.  He then put a stethoscope around his neck and proclaimed he ate turkey Saturday night and promptly got sick with flu.

 

Then he displayed his ignorance even further by expressing his concern for the more than 500 people who dined on free turkey burgers provided at a Capitol cookout Tuesday.

 

Erhardt should be ashamed of his poorly attempted humor at the cost of a significant state industry, the Minnesota turkey industry.

 

"I'm extremely disappointed that Rep. Erhardt would make light of this crisis that's having a devastating impact on families and people's livelihoods in all corners of Minnesota," said Rep. Dave Baker, R-Willmar.

 

We agree.

 

“This crisis is not a joke and not a political issue,” said Rep. Jeanne Poppe, DFL-Austin. “Any attempt to turn it into either is disrespectful of farmers across Minnesota and unbecoming of our shared Minnesota values.”

 

We agree.

 

 

Be assured, Minnesota’s turkey industry is no laughing matter.

 

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture’s top priority is to maintain a secure food supply.



The Minnesota Department of Health has stated there is no risk to humans from eating turkey.

 

The top priority of the turkey industry, including turkey processors, is food safety.

 

Be assured, Minnesota can and should be proud of its turkey industry.

 

Minnesota is the top turkey producing state in the United States, producing and processing about 46 million turkeys a year and generating more than $600 million in income for farmers, processors and related industries.

 

In fact, every Minnesota turkey generates $17.46 in direct economic activity in the state, according to a 2011 University of Minnesota study.

 

Oh, Rep. Erhardt, within hours, issued a news release apologizing for “making light of this serious issue.”

 

Rep. Erhardt stated further he is confident in the Health Department “assessment that consuming turkey is safe for Minnesota.”

 

So Rep. Erhardt, next time you want to be funny, don’t even try and maybe you wouldn’t resemble the back end of your party’s mascot as you did today.

“It is better to keep your mouth closed and let people think you are a fool than to open it and remove all doubt.” - Mark Twain.

 

That  is exactly what happened Tuesday when a city-boy legislator attempted to comment upon Minnesota’s highlly pathogenic avian flu outbreak.

 

State Rep. Ron Erhardt, DFL-Edina, Tuesday afternoon arose on the Minnesota House floor dressed in a white lab coat, according to a Forum News Service report.  He then put a stethoscope around his neck and proclaimed he ate turkey Saturday night and promptly got sick with flu.

 

Then he displayed his ignorance even further by expressing his concern for the more than 500 people who dined on free turkey burgers provided at a Capitol cookout Tuesday.

 

Erhardt should be ashamed of his poorly attempted humor at the cost of a significant state industry, the Minnesota turkey industry.

 

"I'm extremely disappointed that Rep. Erhardt would make light of this crisis that's having a devastating impact on families and people's livelihoods in all corners of Minnesota," said Rep. Dave Baker, R-Willmar.

 

We agree.

 

“This crisis is not a joke and not a political issue,” said Rep. Jeanne Poppe, DFL-Austin. “Any attempt to turn it into either is disrespectful of farmers across Minnesota and unbecoming of our shared Minnesota values.”

 

We agree.

 

 

Be assured, Minnesota’s turkey industry is no laughing matter.

 

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture’s top priority is to maintain a secure food supply.



The Minnesota Department of Health has stated there is no risk to humans from eating turkey.

 

The top priority of the turkey industry, including turkey processors, is food safety.

 

Be assured, Minnesota can and should be proud of its turkey industry.

 

Minnesota is the top turkey producing state in the United States, producing and processing about 46 million turkeys a year and generating more than $600 million in income for farmers, processors and related industries.

 

In fact, every Minnesota turkey generates $17.46 in direct economic activity in the state, according to a 2011 University of Minnesota study.

 

Oh, Rep. Erhardt, within hours, issued a news release apologizing for “making light of this serious issue.”

 

Rep. Erhardt stated further he is confident in the Health Department “assessment that consuming turkey is safe for Minnesota.”

 

So Rep. Erhardt, next time you want to be funny, don’t even try and maybe you wouldn’t resemble the back end of your party’s mascot as you did today.