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Letter: A tired attempt to score points

I found the recent letter stating Mary Sawatzky "is not taking funds from PACs or any other special groups" to be quite comical. Although this may be portrayed as some form of monumental decision on her part, you should think of it it as little m...

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I found the recent letter stating Mary Sawatzky “is not taking funds from PACs or any other special groups” to be quite comical.
Although this may be portrayed as some form of monumental decision on her part, you should think of it it as little more than a choice to find a different way to raise $12,600, and a tired attempt to score a few political points.
Not only is the announcement a tiny amount compared to the total dollars spent on her behalf, it also raises serious questions about her previous time in office.
After all, if Mary Sawatzky believes that taking money from PACs and lobbyists influences how a legislator votes, did the donations she accepted from them influence how she voted during her one term in St. Paul?
Since she cast the tie-breaking vote on legislation that could have forced independent child care providers to unionize, was her vote a result of special-interest donors influencing her decision?
As the largest beneficiary of outside spending in the history of our district, she personally raised thousands of dollars from lobbyists and PACs.
If money could buy elections, Mary Sawatzky would definitely still be our representative.
Whether or not she accepts up to $12,600 in direct support this time, she will continue to benefit from “outside groups” spending lavishly on her behalf.
So the most important question is this.
If, by her own admission, $12,600 is all it takes to influence or buy Mary Sawatzky’s vote, do we have any business sending her back to St. Paul next fall?
Phil Cleary
Willmar

Related Topics: DAVE BAKER
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