Electric vehicles are fantastic, but it is hard to buy one in Minnesota. I own two (a Tesla Model 3 and a Nissan Leaf), and I have no intention of buying a gas-powered car again.

When I go to buy my next electric vehicle, however, the offerings in Minnesota will make it difficult.

Mills Nissan in Willmar does not carry the Leaf, and many manufacturers only ship a small number of their new EV models to Minnesota.

The Department of Transportation found that Minnesotans only have access to about half of the EV models available in the US. Even then, many are sold before they ever hit a dealer lot.

There is clearly a demand for EVs in Minnesota, but the dealers and manufacturers are intentionally limiting our options.

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The longevity of EVs means fewer repeat sales and the lack of maintenance problems (EVs are much simpler mechanically) mean far less money can be made on service.

Add in the reduced fuel cost, and there are a lot of savings to be had.

EVs cost about 3¢/mile in fuel at 12¢/kWh and 4 miles-per-kWh compared to 10¢/mile at 25 mpg and $2.50/gallon or 15¢/mile at 20 mpg and $3.00/gallon.

The best way to give Minnesotans the opportunity to choose EVs is to adopt the Clean Car Standards proposed by Governor Walz.

This is about giving Minnesotans access to the cleaner cars that they want by requiring that manufacturers sell them here (instead of focusing only on the states with similar standards already adopted).

Consumer Reports found that Minnesotans could save $9 billion over the next 15 years by adopting these standards while reducing 2 million tons of CO2 emissions along with other pollution.

These standards are a golden opportunity to help Minnesota’s economy, expand consumer choice, and reduce pollution.

Mark Peterson

New London