We want to call attention to the Line 3 Pipeline expansion which is being implemented in Northern Minnesota and will stretch across a 337-mile route carrying tar sands oil. Multiple concerns should be brought to light surrounding the pipeline. Primarily, the pipeline will be built across multiple freshwater lakes and preserved land which creates a threat to the environment if the pipe were to leak or break.

The carbon-intensive oil that the pipe carries will cause immediate irreversible damage to any wildlife surrounding it, ultimately damaging Minnesota’s environment. The Enbridge company constructing the pipeline has had a significant history of oil spills. The Canadian company is responsible for the largest U.S. inland oil spill to date.

Secondly, the pipeline route will cross through multiple indigenous territories. The route will mainly cross through Wild Rice which is home to the Anishinaabe people. The pollution from the pipeline will contaminate their waters and land refraining them from fishing and farming.

The pipeline does not only put the lives of the Anishinaabe people at risk, but the amount of carbon that is carried throughout the pipeline can also severely pollute the air. The oil within the pipes is about 37% carbon, if emitted into the air it can have a huge impact on climate change along with the air we breathe.

The construction of Pipeline 3 has yet to be stopped, many citizens within the state of Minnesota and Canada believe that this is good for our society and economy. To protect our environment, our community, and our wildlife, we must continue to educate the greater public of Minnesota on this issue.

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To advocate for the MN Pipeline 3 resistance, there are many ways to get involved; some of these include writing a letter to a politician or state representative, donating through honorearth.org, distribute information about or attend Pipeline 3 resistance meetings, and finally spreading awareness throughout the community on this issue.

Let the community know that climate change and environmental destruction are topics to care about!

Madeline M. Addington

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities ‘21