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JASON RAVNSBORG

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Jason Ravnsborg

Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg became the first constitutional officer to be impeached in all of South Dakota's history April 12, 2022, after the state's House of Representatives voted 36-31 in favor of two articles of impeachment.

He was impeached on one article for crimes in officer and another article for malfeasance in office.

The impeachment stems from a Sep. 12, 2020 crash in which Ravnsborg, while driving outside of his lane, struck and killed Joe Boever, a pedestrian walking down a highway at night, near Highmore, South Dakota.

Since the crash, Ravnsborg's driving history has revealed a multitude of tickets across jurisdictional lines, plus the fact that he has identified himself as the Attorney General, leading to warnings instead of citations.

The South Dakota Senate will meet June 21 for a two-day trial to determine if Ravnsborg's impeachment warrants removal from his office.

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With Clay County State’s Attorney Alexis Tracy by his side, Vargo successfully argued against Ravnsborg and his counsel, Sioux Falls attorney Mike Butler and impeachment defense expert Ross Garber.
Impeachment trial of Jason Ravnsborg lasts only a day.
The decision was publicly announced just 11 days before the South Dakota Senate will meet as a Court of Impeachment to decide Ravnsborg's fate as attorney general for the remainder of his term.

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As the process of impeachment and potential removal from office continues, the adopted articles of impeachment will be served upon Ravnsborg, which will trigger a 20-day waiting period before the Senate can begin a trial.
A defense attorney representing Jason Ravnsborg, S.D.'s Attorney General, convinced Judge John Brown on Monday, July 12 in a Pierre courthouse to allow a review of the prescriptions, mental health facility stays of Joe Boever prior to an August trial.
The lawyer defending South Dakota's attorney general says he'll ask a circuit judge to open up medical files the victim to suggest the victim had a history of mental illness. However, motions were due last month, and it's unclear whether the judge will allow the request.
New video shows South Dakota Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg saying he missed two key pieces of evidence the night of his fatal crash on a rural highway — namely a flashlight that investigators say was lit "like a beacon" near the victim's body and a pair of glasses that had landed in Ravnsborg's Ford Taurus after striking the victim on the highway.
The announcement from Hyde County State's Attorney Emily Sovell came more than five months after Jason Ravnsborg admitted he hit and killed 55-year-old Joseph Boever with his car along the shoulder of U.S. Highway 14, just outside the limits of Highmore, S.D., the night of Sept. 12.
The Dakotas will join the friend of the court brief filed by the state of Missouri in Texas v. Pennsylvania. The three states are joined by fourteen others, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah and West Virginia.

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Sioux Falls-based Sanford Health will pay $329,412.12 to South Dakota, to reimburse the state's share of alleged costs from Medicaid claims made from 2010-2019 by a former Sanford neurosurgeon, Dr. Wilson Asfora.
Craig Price, the South Dakota Department of Public Safety cabinet secretary, said evidence shows that Ravnsborg was distracted when he entered the north shoulder of U.S. Highway 14 while traveling westbound, where he struck Joseph Boever, 55, of Highmore.
South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem and Craig Price, her public safety secretary, held a press conference in Sioux Falls on Tuesday, Oct. 13, to release the 911 call audio, a transcript and toxicology reports collected from blood drawn from Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg the day after he fatally struck and killed Highmore resident Joseph Boever with his car last month.

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