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POULTRY

POULTRY

The Minnesota Board of Animal Health released its temporary poultry exhibition ban Friday, July 1. It was first enacted in April in response to highly pathogenic avian influenza.
But you can find barns full of equine, bovine, swine, goats, sheep and such spread throughout the fairgrounds.
The announcement comes as fair season begins. Highly pathogenic avian influenza has affected almost 3 million birds on Minnesota farms in 2022.
A temporary statewide ban on poultry events and exhibitions has been extended a second time, this time until July 1. It includes all poultry swaps, fairs, exhibitions and other events where live poultry and susceptible birds are brought together and then disperse.

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The Minnesota Board of Animal Health's list of confirmed cases of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza totals 79 sites in 28 counties, as of Tuesday, May 24, 2022.
There are 75 sites of confirmed H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza infection in Minnesota as of Tuesday, May 17, according to the Minnesota Board of Animal Health.
Olmsted County joins 59 other Minnesota counties with confirmed cases in wildlife or commercial poultry.
There are 70 sites of confirmed avian flu infection in Minnesota as of Tuesday, May 10. The inventory of flocks diagnosed with H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza is approaching 2.9 million, according to the Minnesota Board of Animal Health.
There are 66 sites of confirmed avian flu infection in Minnesota as of Tuesday, May 3. The inventory of flocks diagnosed with H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza is about 2.73 million, according to the Minnesota Board of Animal Health.
The inventory of flocks in Minnesota diagnosed with H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza now stands at 62 sites, with a total of 2,718,082 birds affected, according to the Minnesota Board of Animal Health. Two additional infection sites were announced Friday, April 29.

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Two additional avian flu infection sites were added to Minnesota's list as of Tuesday, April 26, bringing the total infected sites in the state to 60. The inventory of flocks diagnosed with H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza is about 2.72 million, according to the Minnesota Board of Animal Health.
Summary: While policymakers are well-equipped to fight inflation, that’s cold comfort for the birds and those who care about them. Even in the heavily subsidized world of agriculture, government protection isn’t usually enough to make producers whole when they’re forced to destroy commercial flocks.
The inventory of flocks in Minnesota diagnosed with H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza is now at 2.7 million, according to the Minnesota Board of Animal Health. Four additional infection sites were added to the list as of Monday, April 25, bringing the total infected sites in the state to 58.

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