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RACISM

From the editorial: "If you know the story, share it, how on June 15, 1920, three Black circus workers — Elias Clayton, Elmer Jackson, and Isaac McGhie — just passing through Duluth, were falsely accused of raping a white girl and were arrested. And how they later were ripped from their jail cells by a white mob, dragged up the Duluth hillside, and hung to death from a streetlight."
An editorial cartoon by Adam Zyglis
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U.S. law requires jury pools to represent a fair cross section of the community. Yet people of color are less likely to make it into the jury pool compared to white residents, even though most defendants are people of color. It's a decades-old issue that has defied solutions.

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Summary: Here's my suggestion on one way to fight racism. As one who has worked in television most of my professional life, I want to challenge my colleagues to start doing stories on successful, family-oriented and religious African Americans. I attend a diverse church where the pastor is a man of color and the congregation is made up of different ethnicities - Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican and Black, as well as white. We sing the same hymns and pray together. No TV cameras are there to record the service as a positive image of diversity.
St. Paul’s push to explore reparations for descendants of Black slaves and victims of discriminatory housing practices represents a newer type of push on the issue.
“The real point is that these imperfections in the market have real economic costs in terms of our GDP growth."
American Opinion: While it’s true that lynching is far less common today than it was in the past, it still happens. The 2020 murder of Ahmaud Arbery by three men as he jogged in Georgia might well have fit the legal definition had this law been on the books already. In addition to providing a powerful new tool for prosecutors in such cases, passage of this bill (especially if it’s passed unanimously in a deeply divided Senate) could provide some degree of healing for a nation that still hasn’t fully come to terms with the violent racism of its past — and its present.
Racist incidents tied to school athletics have impacted schools across the state in recent months, ranging from jeers at sporting events to alleged discrimination within teams.
School board members across the United States have endured a rash of terroristic threats and hostile messages ignited by roiling controversies over policies on curtailing the coronavirus, bathroom access for transgender students and the teaching of America’s racial history.

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Andrea Robinson and her children claim teachers and administrators at Rocori School District looked the other way as students used racial slurs in class and sent threatening messages on social media.
Several U.S. and British politicians have in recent months apologized after suggesting vaccine or lockdown policies recalled Hitler's regime.

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