ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

SCIENCE AND NATURE

Two fresh craters pock the moon after a rocket booster impact. We're still trying to figure out whose it is.
The five bright planets will still shine at dawn for the next week or two, but Monday morning, June 27, will be our last chance to see the moon in the lineup.
Biophilia is becoming an increasingly popular principle in integrative medicine as researchers are finding health benefits associated with spending time outside.
Regardless of how bad individual years are, the Minnesota Department of Health is not as concerned with year-to-year trends as it is concerned with the big picture over time, said agency tick disease specialist Elizabeth Schiffman.

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
New guidelines generally support state's current wolf population, but could allow hunting and trapping if federal protections end.
The bill would provide money to states and tribes to recover troubled species
The increase in wetlands from the pervious year was the highest ever, but grasslands are declining.
There are more than five planets at dawn. Hidden in the lineup are Uranus, Neptune and the asteroid Vesta. Oh, and Earth, too.
As we celebrate the new season a brightening comet beckons.
Silky and blue, clouds made of meteor dust glow at the edge of outer space.

ADVERTISEMENT

This remarkable planet parade won't happen again until 2041.
Tuesday night's full moon reminds us it's strawberry season. There's also a chance for auroras the next few nights.
On Sunday evening, June 12, the gibbous moon will almost touch the star Dschubba in the Scorpion. For some observers, it will disappear altogether.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT