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TOURISM

After writing four editions herself, Anne Arthur invited her daughter Signy Sherman to collaborate on the the latest.
After two years of events being canceled or dramatically scaled back due to the pandemic, Minnesota tourism officials are declaring business as usual for the summer of 2022, as several of the state’s big gatherings celebrating anniversaries of note.
A new National Geographic book by Stephanie Pearson is rooted in her childhood exploring Duluth's Hartley Park.
The push comes after tourism and hospitality industry businesses saw a hit from the pandemic and state efforts to curb it.

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Beth Fischer, executive director of the Willmar Lakes Area Convention and Visitors Bureau, has been appointed to the board of the Minnesota Association of CVB, according to a news release from the organization.
Despite the operating loss, the 2021 Fair drew 1.3 million attendees
The Minnesota Department of Transportation plans to remove trees from the Smoky Hills State Forest before it resurfaces Highway 34 in 2023.
While Grand Marais is a year-round destination, these colder months are certainly its more off-season time. This means lodging is less expensive and the town isn’t overflowing with people — all pluses for me, as I was looking for a quiet and relatively inexpensive getaway.
Bentleyville organizers are still looking for volunteers to pick up shifts.
The Swift County Board is seeking federal funds for improvements at the Appleton Off-Highway Vehicle Park while separately working to acquire more land. The commissioners and Appleton Sportsmen's Club representatives discussed how the park and the club's shooting range adjacent to the park can safely co-exist and possibly benefit each other.

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Lauren Bennett McGinty, Executive Director of the Minnesota Craft Brewer's Guild, will assume her new role as director of Explore Minnesota Tourism on Nov. 15.
That means that even in the dead of winter, in the self-proclaimed “Icebox of the Nation,” Smokey will remain shirtless.
Located in the former Mill Pond Mercantile building in downtown New London, the 7,500-square-foot Lucky Duck is filled floor to ceiling with shelves of games, toys, puzzles, books and opportunities for hands-on play. There’s also hand-dipped ice cream, popcorn and old-fashioned sweet treats in the two-story toy store with a mission of fun.

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