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VAULT - ODDITIES

Joseph Rolette is often recognized as the man who kept St. Paul from losing its status as the state capital in 1857, but his actions likely had little effect on the matter. He was memorable, though.
It's now a ghost town, yet in its heyday, everyone might have known your name in Craigville, Minnesota. But their saloons were also reportedly some of the rowdiest and most unruly in the state.
It was an almost impenetrable copper box inside a cornerstone of Trinity Lutheran Church. Members learned it was a time capsule with surprises from the past, but what did the past want to share?
A look back at the Minnesotan who inspired more than one of his songs and how the state's cold spring inspired another.

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The only known flyer from the doomed show in Minnesota became the most expensive concert poster sold at auction. Buddy Holly and several other musicians died on their way to the show in 1959.
The current debate over the daylight-saving time echoes early battles in Minnesota against clock shift mandates, amid a mishmash of local rules.
Built in 1911 to house North Dakotans sick with tuberculosis, the sanatorium near Dunseith, North Dakota, closed in 1989. Left to the elements, the decaying buildings are a popular spot for urban explorers and paranormal investigators.
Built deep within a wooded area on the outskirts of Duluth, the topography of the area was thought to be optimal for housing — and hiding away — patients who had contracted tuberculosis.
History is a huge part of the identity of the Dodge County seat of Mantorville, but even long-time locals are intrigued by the hidden past just off Main Street.
James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok was undoubtedly carrying at least one sidearm in the gold mining town of Deadwood in what was then Dakota Territory. So what happened to Hickok's gun?

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The pyramid and surrounding buildings near Nekoma, North Dakota were created to defend the country’s nuclear weapons during the Cold War. They've been empty for decades. But soon the facility will be a cryptocurrency mine, whose heat will warm an on-site greenhouse.
It was a late winter morning when a cashier's son was returning a borrowed typewriter to the Miltona State Bank in Miltona, Minnesota, and discovered a tampered vault door and an empty safe. Cans of cream, filled with water next to the safe, told the tale. The 'Cream Can Gang' had struck again.
Over time, Dr. Leslie Keeley’s injection became known as the “Gold Cure,” named for its supposed content. Later analysis cast doubt on the idea that gold was used at all, but a foundational principal of Keeley's treatment centers continues today, in programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous.

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